SUPPORT WOMEN'S RIGHTS
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Women have an equal right to control resources and time.

Women’s empowerment is not just about rights. It’s smart economics. Gender inequality costs the Asia Pacific region up to US$47 billion every year. When women are excluded from employment, or when their labour isn’t counted as part of the formal economy, the economic costs affect everyone regardless of gender. If women had equal access to work opportunities, everyone in our region would benefit.

Around the world, women earn an average of 10-30% less than men doing the same type of work. Gender gaps in wages are greatest for the less educated and in the lowest paying occupations. Women also do the majority of unpaid work. In addition to being unpaid, this type of work also tends to be less visible, although it’s critically important to society. An unequal burden of unpaid work limits wider employment opportunities.

The majority of women in our region live in rural areas and depend on agriculture and natural resources to make a living. Women in rural areas own less land than men and have less access to finance. That makes it harder for them to start businesses. When communities are involved in industries such as logging, fisheries or mining, women often don’t get to take part in decision-making and profit-sharing.

IWDA works to improve women’s access to savings and other financial services that support them to build their economic security. We promote women’s equal participation in community decision-making around resources. We also collaborate on ground-breaking innovations in poverty measurement indicators, driving gender visibility in global dialogues about poverty.

IWDA’s partnerships promote women’s equal right to economic empowerment and sustainable livelihoods across Asia and the Pacific.

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IWDA Program Manager Bronwyn Tilbury and FWRM Young Women's Leadership Program Team Leader Maraia Tabunakawai. Photo: Kristy Nowland
IWDA Program Manager Bronwyn Tilbury and FWRM Young Women's Leadership Program Team Leader Maraia Tabunakawai. Photo: Kristy Nowland

Here are a few of our recent achievements

1,500

women in Solomon Islands took part in savings clubs to control their own money, pooling resources to create scalable market opportunities such as an energy market through the collaborative purchasing of solar panels

100

women became savings club leaders in Solomon Islands following leadership training

1

groundbreaking new tool for measuring poverty in a gender-sensitive way was published

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